Cowgirl Cookies

 

IMG_2298You can have your crispy cookies. Your good-to-dip-in-coffee cookies. Your plain and simple. I want cookies chock-full of the good stuff: chocolate, peanut butter, candy bars. I like my ice cream the same way. Don’t give me a Blizzard that’s more ice cream than stuff.

Shelly Jaronsky of the Cookies & Cups blog has a winner with Cowgirl Cookies. These babies feature mini M&M’s, coconut, oatmeal, chocolate chips  and other goodies. Shelly uses raisins, but I always substitute butterscotch or peanut butter chips or more chocolate or white chocolate chips. (And please don’t buy store-brand chips.)

I prefer to underbake. Know your oven, certainly, but I would start at baking for 10 or 11 minutes. As I mentioned, I prefer soft and chewy. And, oh my goodness, the dough! I would easily pass on any cookie as long as I got to eat the cookie dough.

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These freeze beautifully and are delicious extra cold. Give them a try! I’d love to know what you think. And if you haven’t checked out the Cookies & Cups Cookbook, it’s packed with great recipes, especially if you believe in leaving room for dessert.

Author: Cookies & Cups
Serves: 36 large cookies
INGREDIENTS
  • 1½ cups unsalted butter (3 sticks)
  • 2 cups light brown sugar
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla
  • 2 teaspoons baking soda
  • 2 teaspoons coarse sea salt
  • 3 cups flour
  • 3 cups old-fashioned oats
  • 2 cups shredded sweetened coconut
  • 1 cup semisweet chocolate chips
  • 1 cup white chips
  • 1 cup mini M&M’s
  • 1 cup butterscotch chips or peanut butter chips
INSTRUCTIONS
  1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Line your baking sheet with parchment paper and set aside.
  2. In the bowl of your stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, mix the butter and both sugars together on medium speed for 2 minutes, scraping the sides of the bowl as necessary.
  3. Add in eggs and vanilla and mix until combined, about 1 minute.
  4. Turn the mixer to low and add in the baking soda, salt and flour until incorporated.
  5. Next add oats and coconut slowly.
  6. Finally mix in the chocolate chips, white chips, M&M’s and butterscotch or peanut butter chips until evenly combined. The batter will be thick.
  7. Using a large cookie scoop (3 tablespoons) drop the dough onto the prepared baking sheet.
  8. Bake for 13-15 minutes until the edges are lightly golden and tops are just set. I always go a few minutes shorter.
  9. Allow the cookies to cool on the baking sheet for 3 minutes and then transfer them to a wire rack rack to cool completely.
NOTES
Store airtight for up to 5 days
Recipe slightly adapted from Cookies & Cups

Enlightenment on the Tube

The London Underground provided unexpected inspiration.

In 1991, when I was 20, I spent 6 weeks in London on a study abroad trip and another couple weeks taking a Eurail train throughout Europe. As an angsty, small-town girl, everything I saw expanded my world. As I wandered through streets where history beckoned at almost every door and an eclectic mix of residents and tourists strolled the streets, packed the stairs of the London Underground (the Tube) and otherwise went about their day, I felt I was part of something bigger. Winding through backroads on a rickety bus during day trips, listening to the Cure on my Walkman, taking in the pastoral beauty, every moment was one to discover. There were possibilities. London is a metropolis that pulsates with energy and vibrancy, but is also full of smaller, quieter moments that hum beneath the noise.

I loved the Tube. I had never been on anything like it. “Mind the gap” still makes me smile. The world underground was a respite from the noise and heat and smog and smells. It was a journey to somewhere, anywhere new.

One of the things I love about the British, besides their accent and history and the royal family, is their literature. More specifically, their appreciation of it. I soon discovered on the Tube that summer that travelers were treated to poetry posted within the rectangles normally used for advertisements. The Poetry Society’s program Poems on the Underground was started in 1986 to bring poetry to a wider audience. What a British concept (at least in my mind)! I found it so beautiful and un-American to feature poetry prominently where people of every class and ethnicity who rode public transportation could be inspired.

These poems has stayed with me for decades. In reading them, I felt as if the poet was speaking to me. I felt understood.

“The Embankment (The fantasia of a fallen gentleman on a cold, bitter night)” by T.E. Hulme

“Once, in finesse of fiddles found I ecstasy

In a flash of gold heels on the hard pavement.

Now see I

That warmth’s the very stuff of poesy.

Oh, God, make small the old star-eaten blanket of the sky,

That I may fold it round me and in comfort lie.”

Keep in mind my favorite English word at the time was melancholia and my favorite French word was malheureusement (unfortunately).

london underground

Another that captured what it meant to be in a traveler, whose glimpses of pasture and lake and ancient architecture may be fleeting, was this one by A. E. Housman.

“Into my heart an air that kills

From yon far country blows.

What are those blue remembered hills,

What spires, what barns are those?

That is the land of lost content,

I see it shining plain,

The happy highways where I went

And cannot come again.”